There Are No Carparks in the USA,

Peeps, I’ll be the first to admit I’m not perfect, nor is my writing. I know I need an editor; I’m just too broke to pay for one…  And, although I know people living in glass houses shouldn’t complain (unless they can do so anonymously,)  after reading a slew of American romances that came from…

Profane vs Profanity?

My love for creative profanity has been well documented in some of my earlier writings (although my satirical skills are still in their infancy, thus explaining my joyful potty mouth.) But, seriously Peeps, is there anything more entertaining then well crafted insults that ignore the boundaries of good taste? Is profanity limited to the bad…

Another Immutable Writerly Rule

  Treat the below items like the puss filled sebaceous cysts they are and excise them from your manuscript: Obvious/assumed actions and redundant informational  phrases:   Tricky Dick Mugillacutty picked up a slice of pizza in his hand, brought it to his mouth and took a bite. Unless gluttonous acts of pizza perversity are in…

Not Your Mother’s English

English is alive. It grows, changes. Mutating like the forgotten cheese hiding in the back corner of the refrigerator behind the blueberry beer bought two years ago (PMS impulse buy;)  its once pumpkin orange skin, now a green and white mottled velvet. This was never more apparent than when my mom started beta reading Dead…

Nowadays, literally is used interchangeably with figuratively, is this truly acceptable? Does this constitute an erosion of the English l…

Answer by Candace Vianna: No,  to the first part. These are not interchangeable. They are antonyms.  Literally means without interpretation or embellishment, exactly as  stated. Figuratively means you’re not being literal, you’re using figures of speech or are speaking metaphorically.  The  second part of the question is more difficult to pin down. Language  evolves with…

Is this paragraph properly written?

Answer by Candace Vianna: I pretty much agree with the majority on this one, but here’s another punctuation trick to consider. On  the way to his car, Dan analyzed what the man had said: The  warehouse was  occupied on Wednesdays and Thursdays. But the Buffalo  murder occurred  on a Saturday, and Sarah Johnson was killed…